Doctors Worldwide

Reflections from Bangladesh: Meet Dr Una Fahy

Medical Faculty working in Bangladesh in healthcare for the Rohingya Refugees on Doctors Worldwide's medical projects

As part of our ongoing DICE (Doctors Worldwide Improving Care in Health Emergencies) and PGF (Postgraduate Fellowship Programme in Refugee & Migrant Health) Programmes, we have deployed out a number of medical faculty to support our teaching and training in the Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh. In this second of this two-part series, we speak to another faculty member who has previously volunteered with Doctors Worldwide before, to hear more about them and their desire to work on our current projects.

Today, we meet: 

Una Fahy. (Retired) Ob/Gyn specialist

Tell us a bit about yourself?

I’m Irish but did most of my specialist training in the UK. I was a consultant in Obstetrics & Gynecology in Ireland, with interests in minimal access surgery, ambulatory gynaecology, pregnancy loss and gestational trophoblastic disease. I was instrumental in setting up emergency obstetric team (PROMPT) training in my unit. I love walking, cycling, reading, travelling, visiting family and friends. I am trying to get into yoga and art. I have global health experience in Kenya, Peru and Bangladesh. With regards to future goals, I hope to continue with global health work and quality improvement projects.

Why did you apply to work with Doctors Worldwide on our projects in Bangladesh?

DWW focusses on education and mentoring, which I believe offer the greatest chance of sustainable healthcare quality improvement.

Doctors Worldwide obstetrics training in Bangladesh for healthcare workers in the Rohingya refugee camps
From Doctors Worldwide’s Obstetrics Training in Bangladesh (Nov 2020)

What are you looking forward to achieving in this deployment to Bangladesh?

I hope I can play to my strengths in Obs & Gyn. Maternal mortality ratio is high, so personally, I would like to gain more insight into uptake of maternal healthcare, how decisions are made to refer to higher-level care and how responsive referral pathways are within the camps. 

What made you want to return to work with Doctors Worldwide on the refugee healthcare project in Bangladesh?

DWW’s ethos appeals to me. I had a good experience in 2019. I felt that I made a worthwhile contribution. DWW was supportive to faculty members.

/ Thank you so much to Dr Una, for taking the time to answer our questions, and  make sure to subscribe to our mailing list below, and follow us on social media (twitter, facebook, instagram) for regular updates and campaigns!

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